Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month: Disable the Label

“Special needs,” “Differently-Abled,” or “Handicapable.”

not a labelA constant topic that comes up in the realm of disabilities is how to talk about it. What to say, what not to say, what is politically correct and what is preferred. Should we use “people first language” like a person with a disability as opposed to a disabled person or does that have an underlying negative connotation like the disability is something they have or need to be removed from?  Is Special Needs a less aggressive and more respectful term or is it implying that the person in front of you requires something so unique that their needs require their own category? At the end of the day air to breathe, food to eat, shelter, education, healthcare, love, respect, and acceptance are needs that we all have.

So how do we talk about it? What is the correct way to view or speak about a person with a disability?

The answer: As just that. A person.

March is Developmental Disability Awareness Month This month instead of informing you of all the types of disabilities there are. We want you to focus on being aware of the person behind the label.  What if we come together to disable the label and create a world of inclusion, respect, and acceptance. Together we can change the way the world defines and views disability.

How can we all get involved? Good question!

Start at the foundation.
Let’s teach our children. Children are naturally curious, so it is important to be prepared to address their questions about disabilities as openly and honestly as we can. Here are just a few tips to get started:

  1. Let them know it is okay to notice that someone is different because they will. But also inform them that differences are nothing to be ashamed of and that it doesn’t mean there is something wrong. The kid in their class is just like them they just may do things a little differently. It’s like riding their bike down two different paths to get to the same destination.
  2. Teach them to use respectful terminology as best they can. Make sure our children know that terms are not to be used as a joke and the way they say things can be hurtful. A great rule of thumb to remember is that in most cases a description is not needed. Simply using someone’s name is enough and preferred.
  3. Add bullying and differences to your conversations at dinner. Is there someone at school that they see getting bullied or made fun of? Someone that doesn’t have many friends because they are different? Talk to them about how they can speak up and show kindness. Encourage them to be a leader through example.
  4. Most importantly emphasize similarities. We all have traits that make us unique, but we have more in common than we know.

Click here for more tips on teaching children about disabilities or check out this list of recommendations for Children’s Books on Disabilities.

Practice What We Teach
It is important to teach our children these things, but it is even more important to practice what we preach. We are our child’s first and most important teacher and advocate. They are sponges and follow our leads.  Two great ways to help redefine disability and act as an example are:

  1. Focus less on labels and more on the person in front of you. Describing people by their disability sets limitations that are not for you to set. It is better to see people for what they’re able to do. It is about empowering someone to be who they are and live to their full potential.
  2. Speak up. It is unrealistic to pretend that those with disabilities don’t have needs. We all require certain resources and services to thrive but too often children and adults with disabilities lack access to the resources they need, whether through funding cuts or lack of empathy. It is up to us to speak up for one another and for those whose main disability is living in a society that marginalizes them or leaves them out altogether.

Easterseals North Georgia recognizes and respects the whole child. We focus on providing opportunities for children and their families from different backgrounds and with a range of abilities to achieve their full potential. If you would like to learn more about us and how we serve children and families in your community check out our website at or give us a call at 404-943-1070.

boy with drum and therapist


Easterseals is your partner in your child’s development

Being a kid is fun – running, biking and seemingly endless playing. Well, if your child needs help manipulating his muscles, those fun activities are more difficult for him. In our early intervention program, Babies Can’t Wait, we have physical therapists whose goals are to get kids moving. In October we are celebrating physical therapists and all they do, especially for our kids. Jacob worked with a physical therapist to realize his dreams. Here’s his story: jacob-griffith-1


When her son Jacob wasn’t hitting his developmental milestones at a year old, his mom, Susan, was getting very concerned. Luckily, a social worker at the hospital where she works as a nurse suggested contacting Easter Seals North Georgia’s Babies Can’t Wait program for an evaluation.

In January 2014, at 15 months old, Jacob started physical therapy with Aimee. He was only able to roll over. Aimee worked with him and his mom one hour a week. Every week, Susan learned something new from the in-home therapy sessions. What she learned, she would implement the other six days of the week. “We worked on arm strength by laying him across my lap. I’d show him books at a level that would require him to push up on his arms,” said Susan. Continue reading “Easterseals is your partner in your child’s development”

16 Ways to Prepare Children with Autism for Holidays

The following blog post was originally posted on Easter Seals’ National website.

16 Ways to Prepare Children with Autism for Holidays

by Cathy Pratt, Ph.D., BCBA-D

While many happily anticipate the coming holiday season, families with sons/daughters on the autism spectrum also understand the special challenges that may occur when schedules are disrupted and routines broken.

The following tips were developed with input from the Autism Society of America, the Indiana Resource Center for Autism, Easterseals Crossroads, Sonya Ansari Center for Autism at Logan, and the Indiana Autism Leadership Network. We update our list of suggestions annually, and our hope is that by following these few helpful tips as the holiday approaches, families may lessen the stress and anxiety created by the holiday season and make it a more enjoyable experience for everyone.

Continue reading “16 Ways to Prepare Children with Autism for Holidays”

Don’t forget that “good tidings of comfort and joy” applies to you too

Happy Holidays! It’s that time of year again when we spend our days shopping for gifts, running from place to place trying to catch the best deals to put a smile on the face of those we love! While it is an exciting time, it can also be time that we neglect the most precious gifts we already have, our families, especially our children. While we are taking care of holiday business let’s find ways to keep our family and children knowing how special they are to us. Continue reading “Don’t forget that “good tidings of comfort and joy” applies to you too”

Traveling with children with special needs

Spring break is just around the corner, and we have the pollen to prove it! We’ve asked Marjan Holbrook to share her tips for traveling with children with special needs. As a mother of a child with a mitochondrial disease, she knows that preparation is key to a fun, relaxing and family-friendly vacation!

Prepare your child – Use social stories to talk to your child about where you are going and what you are doing. Show them pictures of the places you will be visiting. Consider downloading a GPS app onto a tablet or phone for them, so they know what to expect and possibly save yourself from having to answer the dreaded question(s): are we there yet? Continue reading “Traveling with children with special needs”

2016: A Year in Review and A Look Forward

The theme of 2016 at ESNG was expansion. We expanded our programs, reach, events and accreditations. Let’s take a look back at what we did as we get ready for a fun and exciting 2017.for blog

Last year, we piloted the innovative STEM in early education at our Brookvalley location. Thanks to funding from the Sibley Award and Frances Hollis Brain Foundation, we are expanding the program to our Guice, Mansell and Warsaw locations.

20151112_143926_resized Continue reading “2016: A Year in Review and A Look Forward”

Today we celebrate the progress of Special Education!

What exactly is special education? Special education features instruction and interventions designed to meet the individual needs of each child with a disability. While this doesn’t seem like such a dramatic idea to us now, it is fairly new. In fact, in 1975, the U.S. Congress enacted the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. This landmark law – together with subsequent amendments in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act – protects the rights of infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities and their families.

According to the U.S. Department of Education, “Before IDEA, too many children were denied access to education and opportunities to learn. Providing appropriate education to youngsters from diverse cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds was especially challenging. Further, most families were not afforded the opportunity to be involved in planning or placement decisions regarding their children, and resources were not available to enable children with significant disabilities to live at home and receive an education at neighborhood schools in their community.”

The IDEA has four main purposes: Continue reading “Today we celebrate the progress of Special Education!”